Stanfords – 12 bookshops for 12 months – Book Haul

As I mentioned in my previous post, I did go a little bit over the top with buying books during my trip to Stanfords. I usually buy up to three books on my bookshop adventures, but this time I got carried away and bought eight, which probably is also a testament to how well the books are presented in Stanfords. Throughout this year I bought 23 books so far and read around 25, so I am still ahead, even if by small margin. Let’s hope the next three bookshops are awful 😉

What do we have and why did I get it:

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Ireland. The Autobiography – edited by John Bowman – since the trip to Ireland with my mum two years ago I’ve been saying I probably should know more about the country’s history and the difficult relation with the country I live in, I feel there is a lot of things on both sides that have not been answered for and have been buried deep to make sure the peace will be possible to maintain. As much as I am sure this will be account of only one side I like the idea of it being told by various people rather than just one author.

Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe – Kapka Kassabova – I read her Street Without a Name not so long ago (bought during my other adventure at Daunt Books) and I liked it. I also read few reviews of Border and it feels like it will be a riveting read. I always find the notion of a border fascinating, how arbitrary they are and yet how deeply impactful. Międzymorze that I read a while back described Central and Eastern Europe trying to find the exact border. I hope this will be equally fascinating read.

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Estoril – Dejan Tiago Stankovic – this is a tribute to vacation past. Last year after visiting Porto and Lisbon we ended up in Estoril for our week of beach vacation. It was completely different from anything I expected, no surprise if I selected it based on its proximity to Lisbon and nice beach, rather than finding out anything more about the place. Only during our vacation I discovered that the casino in Estoril was the place to inspire Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale and that during war Estoril was brimming with spies, agents and aristocrats. Some of that posh air still stays, it did feel similar to Cannes, just on a more cosy scale. I loved it, we had a wonderful apartment and fantastic stay, so of course I felt a bit sentimental when I saw this book.

Norse Mythology – Neil Gaiman – I blame this on my mother, when I was a child and read all the fairy tales at home she decided to give me Greek Mythology to read, saying ‘it is like a fairy tale’, I do beg to differ, it is better written than most fairy tales, but it morally doubtful in places 😉 since then I loved reading different mythologies, but somehow I’ve always been a bit behind on the Norse one, maybe because the one we had at home was a particularly boring and academic version. Basically I wanted this book since it’s been published and now I’ve got it!

The next four books are basically preparation for my September vacation, try to guess which cities I’ll be visiting 😉

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Spain – Jan Morris
The Tomb in Seville – Norman Lewis
The Blind Man of Seville – Robert Wilson
A Death in Valencia – Jason Webster

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10 thoughts on “Stanfords – 12 bookshops for 12 months – Book Haul

  1. I bought the Gaiman on Tuesday but the black cover! I have been obsessed with Norse myths since I discovered them aged about 8, and increased that to include the Icelandic sagas as I went on. I am a nightmare to watch the Thor films with, basically. A good haul!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh, great – have you reviewed it on here yet, I’m sure I’m missing some posts from people? I won’t get to my copy for a bit but will review it when I do. I have another book of them coming up before that, too. Like I said: obsessed!

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  2. I haven’t reviewed it yet, it is still in my backlog. I enjoyed reading it, but to be honest by the end I was a bit disappointed, I expected a bit more depth and I got more adventure. There’s no denying though that it reads well. I’ll just have to look for a bit more serious take on things, to get to knwo Norse mythology better 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Norse Mythology – Neil Gaiman – bookskeptic.com

  4. Pingback: Estoril – Dejan Tiago-Stankovic – bookskeptic.com

  5. Pingback: A Death in Valencia – Jason Webster – bookskeptic.com

  6. Pingback: The Blind Man of Seville – Robert Wilson – bookskeptic.com

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